Viewing entries in
Storytelling

Storytelling in Design: How to Identify It and Bring It Into Your Brand

Comment

Storytelling in Design: How to Identify It and Bring It Into Your Brand

We're hiring for a few positions so I spent about 4 hours yesterday reviewing resumes, portfolios and LinkedIn profiles. I stopped at the ones with big brand experience in their portfolios and looked at the ads.  For the most part the ads...looked like ads...with a big famous brand logo on them. "Okay, this is someone who knows the system, who is capable of creating for our clients."

But the few that really caught my eye were designers who were able to tell stories. They highlighted their love for storytelling in their portfolios, even in their approach to creating their own portfolios-- how they told their own stories of who they were, what they did, and why they loved design. It was an entirely different approach to design and self-identity, which made me feel like I was breathing different air. 

Behind every design is an amazing story. Great brands don't hire designers and say, "Design us an ad that tells a story." Storytelling is part of the way the brand THINKS. It's part of brand DNA. Designers follow brand guidelines when creating. Therefore, storytelling must be derived from brand guidelines and brand visual centers that emphasize storytelling. Here are some steps to bring a storytelling approach to your brand:

Write a Brand Manifesto: Great writing is something we can all get behind. The Declaration of Independence is a great example. "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness...inalienable rights..." We each see something powerful when we say those words. Brands are no different. A brand manifesto conjures up an emotional connection. It defines the purpose of the brand--the why, when and where for audiences. Most importantly it creates a bridge from POV to visuals that a great designers can feel and manifest visually.

Create a Visual Center...No Really Do It. Brands need more than visual guidelines that align folks on font types, logo lockups and colors. Great brands that tell great stories need visual centers that show more than use cases. The visual center is where the manifesto and brand values marry the visuals. The story, mood, and purpose of the brand appears with photos, drawings or other stimulating visuals.

Change Your Creative Process: If you're looking at this and wondering why storytelling isn't a big part of everything that is produced, take a step back at the creative process. Is your creative process designed to prioritize storytelling? Does your creative process take into account the hard work that's been done on the visual center and brand guidelines. Are sales goals and deadlines preventing the creative process from actualizing? Take all of these things into consideration and map the process to the importance of storytelling.

If you'd like more info on how to bring better storytelling to your brand, we're happy to help. Yaaas!  Feel free to reach out to us directly. 

Comment

3 Steps to Become a Great Storyteller

Comment

3 Steps to Become a Great Storyteller

Don't let the title fool you. You were born a great storyteller. Storytelling is the fundamental way human beings communicate. Everything we say tells a story.  You do it already in every aspect of your life. So, baby, you were born this way. 

Storytelling for brands is no different. Every brand, product, offering, service, thing-a-ma-jig and whatchamacallit has a story to it--a history, a purpose, a reason why it's important.  As creatives, our job is to make that story come alive and then make it matter to the other person at the receiving end of each touchpoint. So how do we tell great brand stories that make a difference? 

An Example:

We worked with DocuSign to create testimonial videos. Instead of following the corporate interview template that so many other brands do, we were inspired to tell a story of DocuSign use in the out-of-the-office setting of Hawaii, with real customers. The result was an an attractive story that brought DocuSign's product offering to life in a meaningful way. Audiences loved it. The steps we took to tell this story were simple, and we're sharing them with you today. 

3 Steps to Become a Great Storyteller

First, get your facts straight. Great storytelling starts with a thorough understanding of what you're talking about. It involves research and a complete comprehension of the subject matter. It also requires a great understanding of your audience and their preferences. Think about what facts are important for your audience to understand, what reasons they have to believe, and what statistics will make your offering different. If you do this, you're already on the path to creating a great story. 

Set the mood. Having the facts straight on the audience and subject matter will allow you to develop story types that could best resonate with your audience. For instance, the Millennial audience who has a greater mistrust of brands, might trust a brand story that features real people instead of actors. If that's the case, you can start to create relevant stories that feature real people and go from there. In essence, setting the mood is about sculpting the personality of the story, so that your audience can consume it better. 

Finally, be fearless. Creative development is tough, not because it's "hard to do," but often because rejection is hard. Great brands are fearless storytellers. They take on tough issues, and tell tough stories that others shy away from. They may add a flavor of social discourse at times, or take a stand on how things truly are in the world. It's risky to take a stand for something, but the end result is that you're able to differentiate your brand, offering, or products from the other noise that we regularly tune out. 

If you're looking for more insights on how to tell great stories for your brand, connect with us today, or reach out to me directly at desmond@mintyfreshdigital.com.

Comment

Don't Hire a Copywriter. Hire a Persuader.

Comment

Don't Hire a Copywriter. Hire a Persuader.

Sometimes I check my spam folder to see if there is, like, one spectacular, beautiful email from someone who is "the chosen one." Someone who is such an amazing writer that I respond, "Enough with the fraud, you conniving felonious poet, you. Have you ever considered a career in advertising?"

Spam ends up in the spam folder for a reason. While there is a highly technical explanation, let's assume that it's because the writing is "undesired," too. Marketing often depends on the written word, so the story, and every word in it, should move audiences to take action. If you want to hire copywriters who know the art of persuasion, here are some steps we take at Minty Fresh Digital. 

First, get the facts straight. Great copywriters have a complete comprehension of the subject matter. They also understand who they are talking to, what the brand voice sounds like, and how their audiences prefer communication. Persuasive writers have facts on what's important for the audience to understand, what the reasons-to-believe are, and what statistics will make the offering different. Sound familiar? It's also part of the process to great storytelling. 

Color. When we read, our brains convert words to images. That's how we work. When it comes to persuasive copywriting, color brings the language to life. The imagery created by the words should resonate with the audience and awaken senses at the same time. If your current writing doesn't do that, it's a problem. Call us. 

Be specific. You don't have much time. Persuasive writers know their time is limited, as attention spans shorten. Keeping things short and sweet makes a great impression, keeps audiences searching for more and build brand affinity. 

For more insights on how we can help you create persuasive copy that brings gallons of black ink to your bottom line, connect with us today, or reach out to me directly at desmond@mintyfreshdigital.com.

 

Comment